Event Title

An analysis of trace element chemistry in Uinta snowpack and subsequent changing of trace element water chemistry in the Upper Provo watershed

Presenter Information

Hannah Checketts

Location

Logan Country Club

Streaming Media

Start Date

28-3-2017 2:55 PM

End Date

28-3-2017 3:00 PM

Description

Trace elements enter the atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Eventually, atmospheric materials deposit onto snowpack, altering snowpack chemistry. During spring runoff, snowmelt water flows into mountain streams, impacting stream chemistry. The Upper Provo watershed is a location where river chemistry changes during runoff. We analyzed trace metal concentrations, water isotopes, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and other applicable parameters in bulk snowpack and snowmelt runoff during the 2014, 2015 and 2016 runoff seasons. Many element concentrations (Be, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, As, Se U and REEs) increased in the stream when there was high discharge. Similarly, concentrations of DOC increased with discharge. Other elements (i.e. Sr, Mn, Ba) became diluted with discharge. One factor contributing to the fluctuating river chemistry could be explained by the soluble (

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 2:55 PM Mar 28th, 3:00 PM

An analysis of trace element chemistry in Uinta snowpack and subsequent changing of trace element water chemistry in the Upper Provo watershed

Logan Country Club

Trace elements enter the atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Eventually, atmospheric materials deposit onto snowpack, altering snowpack chemistry. During spring runoff, snowmelt water flows into mountain streams, impacting stream chemistry. The Upper Provo watershed is a location where river chemistry changes during runoff. We analyzed trace metal concentrations, water isotopes, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and other applicable parameters in bulk snowpack and snowmelt runoff during the 2014, 2015 and 2016 runoff seasons. Many element concentrations (Be, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, As, Se U and REEs) increased in the stream when there was high discharge. Similarly, concentrations of DOC increased with discharge. Other elements (i.e. Sr, Mn, Ba) became diluted with discharge. One factor contributing to the fluctuating river chemistry could be explained by the soluble (