Session

Session IX: From Earth to Orbit

SSC09-IX-1.pdf (1673 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

On 28 September 2008, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) made history when its Falcon 1 became the first privately-developed, liquid-fueled rocket to achieve Earth orbit. This was the fourth flight of the Falcon 1 launch vehicle from the SpaceX launch site on Omelek Island at the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) in the central Pacific Ocean. It achieved an elliptical orbit of 621 x 643 km, 9 .34 degrees inclination, with full intended performance. With this flight, SpaceX has successfully flight proven 100% of its subsystems including 1st stage ascent, stage separation, 2nd stage ignition, fairing separation, guidance and control accuracies, stage 2 engine shutdown and orbital insertion, payload separation signaling, and stage 2 engine restart capability. A review of the successes and achievements is presented. The successful flight of SpaceX’s Falcon 1 is both historically noteworthy and represents a major opportunity for the satellite industry to finally have access to a low-cost demonstrated launch capability. Developed by SpaceX to provide reliable, low-cost access to space, the capabilities of the Falcon 1 launch vehicle provide unique opportunities for small satellite programs. Two Falcon 1 vehicles have included accommodations for the carriage of multiple secondary satellites in the mission design. A top-level overview of past multiple payload integration activities is discussed, along with the future plans for the Falcon 1 launch vehicle – which are focused on better servicing the needs of the small satellite community. An overview of these plans and how they will positively impact the small satellite community is discussed.

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Aug 12th, 1:45 PM

Falcon 1 Flight Results and Multiple Payload Integration

On 28 September 2008, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) made history when its Falcon 1 became the first privately-developed, liquid-fueled rocket to achieve Earth orbit. This was the fourth flight of the Falcon 1 launch vehicle from the SpaceX launch site on Omelek Island at the U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) in the central Pacific Ocean. It achieved an elliptical orbit of 621 x 643 km, 9 .34 degrees inclination, with full intended performance. With this flight, SpaceX has successfully flight proven 100% of its subsystems including 1st stage ascent, stage separation, 2nd stage ignition, fairing separation, guidance and control accuracies, stage 2 engine shutdown and orbital insertion, payload separation signaling, and stage 2 engine restart capability. A review of the successes and achievements is presented. The successful flight of SpaceX’s Falcon 1 is both historically noteworthy and represents a major opportunity for the satellite industry to finally have access to a low-cost demonstrated launch capability. Developed by SpaceX to provide reliable, low-cost access to space, the capabilities of the Falcon 1 launch vehicle provide unique opportunities for small satellite programs. Two Falcon 1 vehicles have included accommodations for the carriage of multiple secondary satellites in the mission design. A top-level overview of past multiple payload integration activities is discussed, along with the future plans for the Falcon 1 launch vehicle – which are focused on better servicing the needs of the small satellite community. An overview of these plans and how they will positively impact the small satellite community is discussed.