Session

Session IX: From Earth to Orbit

SSC09-IX-2.pdf (2577 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

The dynamic environment that a spacecraft will experience during a launch is unknown until a full coupled loads analysis (CLA) has been performed by the launch vehicle contractor. By the time this has been done, the small satellite provider might not have time to mitigate problem areas by redesigning component mounts or alternatively installing isolating mounts. Unmitigated loads issues could increase the risk of failure of not only a component, but of the entire mission. This current process of mission planning is costly and inefficient. A better approach is to have coupled loads analysis data available for real spacecraft of various sizes on multiple launch vehicles in order to know what the expected environment will be for a particular spacecraft and launch vehicle combination. To further ensure that any unknown vehicle loads will not be detrimental to the spacecraft, the installation of a SoftRide wholespacecraft isolation system can reduce the transmitted loads. This is the approach currently under study for the Office of Responsive Space (ORS) by CSA Engineering whereby many small spacecraft (less than 1500 lbs) are being analyzed on five separate launch vehicles and key spacecraft responses are being tracked. These responses will drive the creation of a small set of SoftRide “sizes” which can be premanufactured and stored on-the-shelf in anticipation of any upcoming launch. A software tool will be able to identify the expected loads on the spacecraft and the correct size SoftRide for the mission when a user enters information about the payload into a database which contains results from the entire set of generic payload analyses. This analysis and implementation methodology is being developed for ORS to help their need for a quick satellite launch aboard any available launch vehicle (LV) with only a few weeks notification. ORS’s needs can be a benefit to all small payloads because of the large loads database which can provide insight into a launch vehicle’s environment (using SoftRide) for spacecraft design purposes.

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Aug 12th, 2:00 PM

Rapid Coupled Loads Analysis and Spacecraft Load Reduction using SoftRide

The dynamic environment that a spacecraft will experience during a launch is unknown until a full coupled loads analysis (CLA) has been performed by the launch vehicle contractor. By the time this has been done, the small satellite provider might not have time to mitigate problem areas by redesigning component mounts or alternatively installing isolating mounts. Unmitigated loads issues could increase the risk of failure of not only a component, but of the entire mission. This current process of mission planning is costly and inefficient. A better approach is to have coupled loads analysis data available for real spacecraft of various sizes on multiple launch vehicles in order to know what the expected environment will be for a particular spacecraft and launch vehicle combination. To further ensure that any unknown vehicle loads will not be detrimental to the spacecraft, the installation of a SoftRide wholespacecraft isolation system can reduce the transmitted loads. This is the approach currently under study for the Office of Responsive Space (ORS) by CSA Engineering whereby many small spacecraft (less than 1500 lbs) are being analyzed on five separate launch vehicles and key spacecraft responses are being tracked. These responses will drive the creation of a small set of SoftRide “sizes” which can be premanufactured and stored on-the-shelf in anticipation of any upcoming launch. A software tool will be able to identify the expected loads on the spacecraft and the correct size SoftRide for the mission when a user enters information about the payload into a database which contains results from the entire set of generic payload analyses. This analysis and implementation methodology is being developed for ORS to help their need for a quick satellite launch aboard any available launch vehicle (LV) with only a few weeks notification. ORS’s needs can be a benefit to all small payloads because of the large loads database which can provide insight into a launch vehicle’s environment (using SoftRide) for spacecraft design purposes.