Session

Session XII: The Next Generation

SSC09-XII-9.pdf (3496 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

SwissCube is the first pico-satellite developed by the Space Center at the Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne (EPFL) in partnership with the University of Neuchatel and five engineering schools (HES-SO, FHNW) in Switzerland. SwissCube will be launch on PSLV in summer 2009 . The educational objective of the project is to provide a hands-on experience of the whole development cycles of satellites, and in parallel enhance flexibility, work autonomy and communication skills in a team composed of about 15 laboratories. SwissCube primary science objective is to measure the intensity of the airglow, a thin luminescence layer in the upper atmosphere that emits in near-infrared. For that purpose, a custom made telescope with a CMOS detector was designed. The concept for a low-cost Earth-sensor will also be validated with this telescope. The project built three models (Engineering Qualification Model, Flight Model, and Flight Spare) and extensively tested the EQM. This paper will present the project organization, mission, and satellite description. It will outline the capabilities and performance of the satellite as characterized during the test campaign. Technical as well as programmatic lessons learned will be addressed. Flight results will also be discussed if available.

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Aug 13th, 12:30 PM

Lessons Learned from the First Swiss Pico-Satellite: SwissCube

SwissCube is the first pico-satellite developed by the Space Center at the Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne (EPFL) in partnership with the University of Neuchatel and five engineering schools (HES-SO, FHNW) in Switzerland. SwissCube will be launch on PSLV in summer 2009 . The educational objective of the project is to provide a hands-on experience of the whole development cycles of satellites, and in parallel enhance flexibility, work autonomy and communication skills in a team composed of about 15 laboratories. SwissCube primary science objective is to measure the intensity of the airglow, a thin luminescence layer in the upper atmosphere that emits in near-infrared. For that purpose, a custom made telescope with a CMOS detector was designed. The concept for a low-cost Earth-sensor will also be validated with this telescope. The project built three models (Engineering Qualification Model, Flight Model, and Flight Spare) and extensively tested the EQM. This paper will present the project organization, mission, and satellite description. It will outline the capabilities and performance of the satellite as characterized during the test campaign. Technical as well as programmatic lessons learned will be addressed. Flight results will also be discussed if available.