Session

Technical Session XI: Mission Lessons II

SSC12-XI-3_presentation.pdf (1829 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

Operationally Responsive Space-1 (ORS-1) is the first ORS Office operational satellite and an important milestone to demonstrate the capability to meet emerging and persistent warfighter needs in operationally relevant timelines. Launched in June 2011, ORS-1 was initiated at the direction of the Commander, U.S. Strategic Command and the DoD Executive Agent for Space to address a U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) need for enhanced battlefield awareness. The ORS Office led an assessment that produced a unique solution with proven operational utility providing timely coverage and responsive theater tasking that avoided the burden of traditional top-down procurements and provides future growth leveraging upgrades in airborne/space assets. The ORS-1 team went from the drawing board to the launch pad within 32 months and earned early combatant command acceptance in September 2011, less than 90 days after liftoff. ORS-1 is the first and only dedicated space intelligence capability for USCENTCOM, introducing Operationally Responsive Space as a new paradigm for DoD. The $224M program includes the satellite based on Goodrich's SYERS-2 payload and the proven ATK TacSat-3 bus, two mission data downlink sites, mission data processing system, and satellite command and control ground system, interfaces with the existing airborne ISR exploitation and dissemination systems, Minotaur I launch vehicle, and operations. The team doggedly adhered to a “good enough to win” approach to deliver a capability that was affordable, rapid, and risk tolerant. ORS-1 provides USCENTCOM an assured ISR capability that cannot be preempted by support to other users. It is an enabler for sustaining operations and objectives in a highly volatile region and is laying the path for future rapid reaction space systems. This paper will review the program objectives and accomplishments to date as well as the Lessons Learned already being applied to other responsive space initiatives.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 16th, 11:00 AM

Operationally Responsive Space-1 (ORS-1) Lessons Learned

Operationally Responsive Space-1 (ORS-1) is the first ORS Office operational satellite and an important milestone to demonstrate the capability to meet emerging and persistent warfighter needs in operationally relevant timelines. Launched in June 2011, ORS-1 was initiated at the direction of the Commander, U.S. Strategic Command and the DoD Executive Agent for Space to address a U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) need for enhanced battlefield awareness. The ORS Office led an assessment that produced a unique solution with proven operational utility providing timely coverage and responsive theater tasking that avoided the burden of traditional top-down procurements and provides future growth leveraging upgrades in airborne/space assets. The ORS-1 team went from the drawing board to the launch pad within 32 months and earned early combatant command acceptance in September 2011, less than 90 days after liftoff. ORS-1 is the first and only dedicated space intelligence capability for USCENTCOM, introducing Operationally Responsive Space as a new paradigm for DoD. The $224M program includes the satellite based on Goodrich's SYERS-2 payload and the proven ATK TacSat-3 bus, two mission data downlink sites, mission data processing system, and satellite command and control ground system, interfaces with the existing airborne ISR exploitation and dissemination systems, Minotaur I launch vehicle, and operations. The team doggedly adhered to a “good enough to win” approach to deliver a capability that was affordable, rapid, and risk tolerant. ORS-1 provides USCENTCOM an assured ISR capability that cannot be preempted by support to other users. It is an enabler for sustaining operations and objectives in a highly volatile region and is laying the path for future rapid reaction space systems. This paper will review the program objectives and accomplishments to date as well as the Lessons Learned already being applied to other responsive space initiatives.