Event Title

Simultaneous Multi-Point Space Weather Measurements using the Low Cost EDSN CubeSat Constellation

Session

Pre-Conference: CubeSat Developers' Workshop

SSC13-WK-41.pdf (4422 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

The ability to simultaneously monitor spatial and temporal variations in penetrating radiation above the atmosphere is important for understanding both the near Earth radiation environment and as input for developing more accurate space weather models. Due to the high variability of the ionosphere and radiation belts, producing such a data product must be done using high density multi-point measurements. The most recent solar and space physics decadal survey states that these measurement densities have the potential to be provided by CubeSat constellations. The primary scientific purpose of the Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks (EDSN) mission is to demonstrate that capability by launching and deploying a fleet of eight CubeSats into a loose formation approximately 500 km above Earth. The Energetic Particle Integrating Space Environment Monitor (EPISEM) payload on EDSN will characterize the radiation environment in low-earth orbit (LEO) by measuring the location and intensity of energetic charged particles simultaneously over a geographically dispersed area. This is made possible because the EPISEM samples are acquired from across the dispersed constellation of eight EDSN spacecraft. This paper describes the fabrication approach of this miniaturized radiation detection instrument and operational considerations unique to constellation missions of this class. Collection timelines and data return models will be provided for the initial 60 day lifetime and a possible extended mission. The EPISEM payload was specifically designed for CubeSats; leveraging heritage from the payload operating aboard Montana State University’s Hiscock Radiation Belt Explorer (HRBE), launched in October 2011. The EDSN project is based at NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and is funded by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP) in NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) at NASA Headquarters, Washington. The EDSN satellites are planned to fly late 2013 as secondaries on a DoD Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) mission that will launch into space from Kauai, Hawaii on a Super Strypi launch vehicle. The EPISEM payload was designed, built, tested, and delivered to NASA Ames by the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory at Montana State University.

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Aug 10th, 12:10 PM

Simultaneous Multi-Point Space Weather Measurements using the Low Cost EDSN CubeSat Constellation

The ability to simultaneously monitor spatial and temporal variations in penetrating radiation above the atmosphere is important for understanding both the near Earth radiation environment and as input for developing more accurate space weather models. Due to the high variability of the ionosphere and radiation belts, producing such a data product must be done using high density multi-point measurements. The most recent solar and space physics decadal survey states that these measurement densities have the potential to be provided by CubeSat constellations. The primary scientific purpose of the Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks (EDSN) mission is to demonstrate that capability by launching and deploying a fleet of eight CubeSats into a loose formation approximately 500 km above Earth. The Energetic Particle Integrating Space Environment Monitor (EPISEM) payload on EDSN will characterize the radiation environment in low-earth orbit (LEO) by measuring the location and intensity of energetic charged particles simultaneously over a geographically dispersed area. This is made possible because the EPISEM samples are acquired from across the dispersed constellation of eight EDSN spacecraft. This paper describes the fabrication approach of this miniaturized radiation detection instrument and operational considerations unique to constellation missions of this class. Collection timelines and data return models will be provided for the initial 60 day lifetime and a possible extended mission. The EPISEM payload was specifically designed for CubeSats; leveraging heritage from the payload operating aboard Montana State University’s Hiscock Radiation Belt Explorer (HRBE), launched in October 2011. The EDSN project is based at NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, and is funded by the Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP) in NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) at NASA Headquarters, Washington. The EDSN satellites are planned to fly late 2013 as secondaries on a DoD Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) mission that will launch into space from Kauai, Hawaii on a Super Strypi launch vehicle. The EPISEM payload was designed, built, tested, and delivered to NASA Ames by the Space Science and Engineering Laboratory at Montana State University.