Session

Technical Session VI: Strength in Numbers

SSC13-VI-2.pdf (3656 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

The Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) is a "think and do tank" established at Caltech where a small group of not more than 30 persons interact for a few days to explore various frontier topics in space studies. The primary purpose of KISS is to develop new planetary, Earth, and astrophysics space mission concepts and technology by bringing together a broad spectrum of scientists and engineers for sustained scientific and technical interaction. In July and October of 2012 a study program, with 30 participants from 14 institutions throughout academia, government, and industry, was held on the unique role small satellites can play to revolutionize scientific observations in space science from LEO to deep space. The first workshop identified novel mission concepts where stand-alone, constellation, and fractionated small satellite systems can enable new targeted space science discoveries in heliophysics, astrophysics, and planetary science including NEOs and small bodies. The second workshop then identified the technology advances necessary to enable these missions in the future. In the following we review the outcome of this study program as well as the set of recommendations identified to enable these new classes of missions and technologies.

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Aug 13th, 4:15 PM

Findings of the KECK Institute for Space Studies Program on Small Satellites: A Revolution in Space Science

The Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) is a "think and do tank" established at Caltech where a small group of not more than 30 persons interact for a few days to explore various frontier topics in space studies. The primary purpose of KISS is to develop new planetary, Earth, and astrophysics space mission concepts and technology by bringing together a broad spectrum of scientists and engineers for sustained scientific and technical interaction. In July and October of 2012 a study program, with 30 participants from 14 institutions throughout academia, government, and industry, was held on the unique role small satellites can play to revolutionize scientific observations in space science from LEO to deep space. The first workshop identified novel mission concepts where stand-alone, constellation, and fractionated small satellite systems can enable new targeted space science discoveries in heliophysics, astrophysics, and planetary science including NEOs and small bodies. The second workshop then identified the technology advances necessary to enable these missions in the future. In the following we review the outcome of this study program as well as the set of recommendations identified to enable these new classes of missions and technologies.