Presenter Information

Mary Dahm, University of Denver

Location

University of Utah

Start Date

12-6-1996 11:45 AM

Description

Star formation is one of the most widely studied subjects in astronomy today, but many· aspects of the star forming process are still not well understood. One aspect of star formation that still needs research involves collective star formation; this is where the formation of stars occurs in a group rather than in isolation. This is now believed to be the most common environment for stellar evolution. When studying collective star forming regions, it is important to understand how massive stars form at the center of star clusters, and influence other stars to form at high efficiencies.- One such region that is a good example is the Trapezium, or Ney-Allen Nebula, in the Orion Nebula. Using the University of Denver's Ten aNd Twenty micron CAMera (TNTCAM), the Trapezium nebula was imaged at 7.8, 10.3, 11.6, 12.4, and 18,0 p.m. In this wavelength region, known as the mid-infrared, the dust surrounding the region can directly be observed, because it primarily radiates at a temperature from 150 to 300 Kelvin. By studying the arc structure of the dust, astronomers will better understand the triggering mechanisms of star formation in collective star forming regions.

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Jun 12th, 11:45 AM

Mid-Infrared Imaging of Star Forming Regions

University of Utah

Star formation is one of the most widely studied subjects in astronomy today, but many· aspects of the star forming process are still not well understood. One aspect of star formation that still needs research involves collective star formation; this is where the formation of stars occurs in a group rather than in isolation. This is now believed to be the most common environment for stellar evolution. When studying collective star forming regions, it is important to understand how massive stars form at the center of star clusters, and influence other stars to form at high efficiencies.- One such region that is a good example is the Trapezium, or Ney-Allen Nebula, in the Orion Nebula. Using the University of Denver's Ten aNd Twenty micron CAMera (TNTCAM), the Trapezium nebula was imaged at 7.8, 10.3, 11.6, 12.4, and 18,0 p.m. In this wavelength region, known as the mid-infrared, the dust surrounding the region can directly be observed, because it primarily radiates at a temperature from 150 to 300 Kelvin. By studying the arc structure of the dust, astronomers will better understand the triggering mechanisms of star formation in collective star forming regions.