Title

Reproductive Ecology and Early Life History of a Lacustrine Sculpin, Cottus extensus (Teleostei, Cottidae)

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Environmental Biology of Fishes

Volume

53

Issue

2

Publisher

Springer Verlag

Publication Date

1998

First Page

117

Last Page

127

DOI

10.1023/A:1007436502285

Abstract

Using a variety of sampling techniques and observations we describe aspects of the reproductive ecology and early life-history of Bear Lake sculpin, Cottus extensus, a species endemic to Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho. Adult sculpin spawned in shallow water (0.5–6.0 m depths) in cavities beneath large cobbles and boulders. During 1993, egg mass densities were highest (> 4.0 m2) at 1.0–2.0 m depths. Electivity indices verified substrate selection and also indicated an avoidance of s and- and gravel-embedded materials. During years of low water elevation, suitable spawning substrates were restricted to one or two limited areas of the lake and comprised < 0.004% of the total benthic area. Disturbance from turbulence, as would be produced by storm-induced waves, appeared to initiate hatching. After hatching, embryos passed through a pelagic interval that lasted for approximately one week. Laboratory experiments confirmed the short duration of this surface-swimming behavior. The pelagic behavior of free embryos appears to aid in dispersal of fish via currents from limited spawning habitats to areas throughout the 282 km2 lake.

Comments

Originally published by Springer Verlag. Publisher's PDF available through remote link.