Document Type

Report

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Annual Progress Report 1989

Volume

47

Issue

4

Publication Date

3-1990

First Page

1

Last Page

115

Abstract

Juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. (ca. 80 mm S.L.) stocked into mid-elevation reservoirs in Utah are vulnerable to predation from piscivorous fish and birds. I determined how effectively juvenile trout used cover to avoid these predators by using direct observations (snorkel transects) on habitat selection in two reservoirs. Observations of juvenile trout were conducted within five weeks of stocking in 1988 and 1989. During the day juvenile trout were abundant in complex inshore habitats. Juvenile trout actively fed during the day but the time of peak feeding was variable. Large Daphnia made of > 95% of the diet of juvenile trout. Because large Daphnia was often higher offshore than inshore in both reservoirs. selection of inshore cover is believed to be primarily a response to lessen predation risk. At night. trout in both reservoirs selected more exposed areas and rested on the bottom.

Comments

This work made publicly available electronically on July 16, 2012.

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