Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Oriental Insects

Volume

10

Issue

1

Publication Date

3-1-1976

First Page

1

Last Page

9

Abstract

Nests of Ceratina propinqua Cameron and Pithitis smaragdula (F) consist of burrows in pithy stalks, each containing a series of brood cells (the oldest below), separated by pith partitions and guarded by the mother bee. In the former species, the uppermost cell is not sealed and the female may contact her youngest larva; in the latter, cells are frequently seperated by vacant spaces. The nests of Braunsapis parvula (Smith) are simple burrows in pith without partitions. The larvae are probably moved about by the female (s) and fed progressively from pollen catches deposited on the burrow walls; several females may share oviposition.

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