Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Annals of the Entomological Society of America

Volume

77

Issue

6

Publication Date

11-1-1984

First Page

725

Last Page

732

Abstract

The mite Kennethiella trisetosa is phoretic on adults of the wasp Ancistrocerus antelope and develops in the nest with immature wasps. Female mites and a large type of male develop oviparously, whereas a small male develops ovoviviparously. Small males kill each other, but are ignored by large males. By mating with females before small males are mature, large males may monopolize fertilization. Larvae of female wasps usually destroy mites within their cells, but, as adults, are reinfested when mated by mire-bearing males. Each time a male wasp mates, about half of its mites transfer to the female. The population structure of the mites has resulted in female-baised sex ratios. Despite feeding by mites on wasp body fluids, the two species could be mutually beneficial.

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