Date of Award:

7-2012

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez, Ph.D.

Abstract

Marital quality is a broad measurement of perceptions of satisfaction, happiness, and stability by partners in an established relationship. Marital quality has been relatively understudied among Mexican Americans, a population that warrants the inclusion of cultural constructs in any model concerning relationship outcomes. Therefore, acculturation differences between Mexican American couples were conceptualized as a distal context for understanding marital quality. Traditional gender role values and communication style (warmth and hostility) were included as proximal contexts. Data from Conger’s California Families Project were utilized; results indicated that while most measures of acculturation did not impact marital quality, language use interacted with gender roles values and communication style to influence husbands’ marital quality. Warmth, hostility, and traditional gender role values all exhibited a significant direct influence on marital quality for both husbands and wives. Potential explanations and recommendations for future directions are discussed.

Comments

This work was made publicly available electronically on September 30, 2011.

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Psychology Commons

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