Date of Award:

11-2011

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Melanie M. Domenech Rodríguez, Ph.D.

Abstract

The following study is a secondary data analysis of data collected in the first wave of the California Families Project investigating the impact that discrimination in academic settings may have on academic outcomes of Mexican American youths. Primary socialization theory offers a conceptual framework of competing socialization influences bearing particular relevance in understanding the role of discrimination in Mexican American youths. The present investigation also seeks to clarify the protective role of various parenting practices in regarding academic achievement. Three hundred sixty-five Mexican American families were surveyed and results indicated that discrimination significantly predicted negative academic self-efficacy and poorer academic performance in crystallized measures of ability (i.e., verbal skills) but not a performance-based task (i.e., visuospatial skills and processing speed). Findings suggested that the influence of parenting in mitigating discrimination for fifth graders is limited.

Comments

Publication made available electronically December 21, 2011.

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