Date of Award:

7-18-2012

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Donna Gilbertson

Abstract

Recently, Direct Behavior Ratings have been shown to be a promising new tool for observing students and classrooms in an education setting for a variety of behaviors. The traditional method of observing students and classroom behavior was through tools called Systemic Direct Observations. Currently, there are only a few studies looking at the use of a Direct Behavior Rating as a device to collect peer comparison data to estimate classwide behavior problems. This study examined the estimated percentages of on-task and disruptive behavior between a Systemic Direct Observation with momentary time sampling and three random peers, a Systemic Direct Observation with momentary time sampling using the entire class, and a Direct Behavior Rating. Multiple undergraduate classrooms were taped and divided up into twenty-five 7-minute segments. The videos were then coded on all three of the observation forms with 100% reliability ratings. Results indicated that there was a strong relationship between the Direct Behavior Rating and the SDO classwide on-task estimates with 37% of the variance in the Systemic Direct Observation classwide data consistent with the Direct Behavior Rating data. There was a moderate relationship between the on-task Direct Behavior Rating and three-peer on-task with 13% of the variance in the Systemic Direct Observation data as a portion of the Direct Behavior Rating data. Results also showed that there was a significant correlation between Direct Behavior Rating both of the Systemic Direct Observation methods with 43% for the classwide Systemic Direct Observation and 39% of the three-peers Systemic Direct Observation variance consistent with the Direct Behavior Rating data. Implications and future directions were considered. The research yielded results that indicated that Direct Behavior Ratings might be a useful tool when evaluating classwide behavior, and that further research is warranted.

Comments

This work made publicly available electronically on July 29, 2012.

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