Date of Award:

2013

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Computer Science

Advisor/Chair:

Curtis Dyreson

Abstract

Video is a massive amount of data that contains complex interactions between moving objects. The extraction of knowledge from this type of information creates a demand for video analytics systems that uncover statistical relationships between activities and learn the correspondence between content and labels. However, those are open research problems that have high complexity when multiple actors simultaneously perform activities, videos contain noise, and streaming scenarios are considered. The techniques introduced in this dissertation provide a basis for analyzing video. The primary contributions of this research consist of providing new algorithms for the efficient search of activities in video, scene understanding based on interactions between activities, and the predicting of labels for new scenes.

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