Date of Award:

2004

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Family, Consumer, and Human Development

Advisor/Chair:

Thomas R. Lee

Abstract

This study examined whether higher family involvement plus additional mentoring relationships had a greater positive effect than a one-on-one relationship with a mentor and low family involvement. The study demonstrated, in this sample, that having two mentors does not have a greater impact on academic motivation, social competency, family unity, self-esteem, and deviance than having one mentor. It was also shown, in this sample, that higher family involvement does not have a greater impact on academic motivation, social competency, family unity, self-esteem, and deviance than lower family involvement. Although additional studies are needed to fully understand the impacts of mentoring and family involvement, this study suggests that the multiple components of two mentors and increased family involvement do not have a greater impact on at-risk youth than a traditional mentoring program utilizing only one-on-one mentoring. The information from this study could prove useful in designing comprehensive support programs for families of at-risk children.

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