Date of Award:

1970

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Education

Department name when degree awarded

Educational Administration

Advisor/Chair:

James P. Shaver

Abstract

The effect of teaching critical thinking as part of a continuous progress packet in American history was studied at Cedar High School during the 1969-70 school year. An experimental group using the critical thinking packet was compared with a control group that used a continuous progress packet that taught only American history.

The dependent variables for the study were the STEP (Sequential Test of Educational Progress), Social Studies portion, and the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups in either American history or critical thinking.

Differences in critical thinking ability, though not significant statistically, seemed to indicate the desirability of further research in this area. It was also recommended, as a result of this study, that further research be conducted to develop and evaluate new methods of assessing student competence in seminar situations.

Comments

The effect of teaching critical thinking as part of a continuous progress packet in American history was studied at Cedar High School during the 1969-70 school year. An experimental group using the critical thinking packet was compared with a control group that used a continuous progress packet that taught only American history.

The dependent variables for the study were the STEP (Sequential Test of Educational Progress), Social Studies portion, and the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups in either American history or critical thinking.

Differences in critical thinking ability, though not significant statistically, seemed to indicate the desirability of further research in this area. It was also recommended, as a result of this study, that further research be conducted to develop and evaluate new methods of assessing student competence in seminar situations.

Share

COinS