Date of Award:

1-1-1975

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

Advisor/Chair:

Lincoln McClellan

Abstract

Data for this study was gathered by questionnaires completed by thirteen drill team directors, thirty-eight women physical education department heads at schools not having a drill team, fifty-six girls who were members of the precision drill team at their school and 416 girls who were not members of a precision drill team.

Drill team directors indicated strong feelings of success as to the organization and administration of their groups and also were positive as to the merits of precision drill teams in the junior high schools. The majority of the physical education department heads did not desire that a precision drill team be organized at their school although many indicated that they realized some of the merits of such groups. Administrative philosophy appeared to be the biggest reason why these schools did not include a drill team in the school curriculum. Drill team members believed strongly in the benefits of a junior high school drill team, indicating their feelings of success and personal satisfaction as a result of their participation. The majority of non-drill team members indicated that they would like to be a drill team member and showed strong support for the drill team at their school.

Findings indicated that all of the respondents were in harmony as to the merits of a drill team and nearly any school desiring a drill team would be able to with the only possible restriction being lack of facilities.

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