Date of Award:

1992

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department:

Education

Advisor/Chair:

Ross Allen

Abstract

Home/school/community factors of student jobs, extracurricular activities, church activities, community activities, family activities, and television watching were examined to determine the relationship between these factors and the time students spent on homework. Two hundred forty-seven high school students were used as subjects. A student time log and questionnaire were developed and used to collect the data. Eight students were closely examined through case studies. When time spent on homework was correlated with time spent at a job, the results were strongly negative (r = -.89). Time spent on homework was moderately correlated (r= + .46) with time spent in extracurricular activities. When time spent on homework was correlated with time spent in family activities, the results were moderately negative (r= -.41 ). Time spent on homework was moderately correlated (r= +.64) with time spent in church activities. When time spent on homework was correlated with time spent watching television, the results were strongly negative (r = -.77). No statistically significant difference was found between the number of conflicts above average students reported doing homework and the number of conflicts below average students reported doing homework. A call was made for parents, students, and school personnel to beware of the possible negative effects of students spending excessive time at jobs, watching television, and in extracurricular activities.

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Education Commons

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