Date of Award:

5-1941

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Plants, Soils, and Climate

Advisor/Chair:

D.C. Tingey

Abstract

Farmers and agriculturalists have in recent years become more conscious of the seriousness of the weed problems. The solution of this problem is obviously the development of more efficient and less costly methods of eradication. Most pernicious weeds are propagated vegetatively by means of underground parts in which reserve food is stored as a source of energy in tiding the plant over winter and initiating spring growth each year. In order to get at the behavior of these perennial parts, it is necessary to resort to a study of root reserves. This involves information not only on the composition of the roots but also as to the quantity of roots. Since it is impossible to harvest all the roots, sampling must be used to furnish an estimate of the total quantity.

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