Date of Award:

1980

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences

Advisor/Chair:

Daren P. Cornforth

Abstract

A process in which low methoxyl pectin is applied to the surface of meat carcasses and poultry to reduce shrinkage, maintain color and improve shelf life was evaluated. A 3.0 percent aqueous low methoxyl pectin (acidified with 1.4 percent acetic acid if required) was applied to beef, lamb and turkey carcasses by spraying and caused to form a gel coating by overspraying with a 3.5 percent calcium chloride salt solution.

Turkey carcasses treated with acidified pectin or acidified pectin after 3.0 percent acetic acid dip for 30 seconds were not significantly improved in shelf life over carcasses which were acid dipped 30 seconds. Pectin coating of turkey carcasses was determined infeasible due to discoloration.

Pectin coated lamb carcasses were significantly lower in shrinkage (0.71 ±0.04 percent) (p

Pectin coated beef carcasses were significantly lower in shrinkage (0.44 ±0.38 percent) (p

Both acidified pectin (pH 3.5) and unacidified pectin (pH 4.1) significantly (p

Checksum

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Included in

Food Science Commons

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