Date of Award:

1990

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Damian McShane

Abstract

Previous surveys of mental health professionals regarding theoretical orientation and the use of various treatment modalities provided valuable information concerning the nature of mental health delivery but primarily focused on professionals providing services to dominant-culture clientele. The present study focused on those degreed workers whose primary clientele were American Indian. Questionnaires were returned by 140 mental health workers who are American Psychological Association (APA) members of American Indian descent, members of the Society of Indian Psychologists (SIP), employees of the Indian Health Service (IHS), and graduate psychology students. Questionnaire responses were analyzed in terms of orientation and treatment modality for various subgroups of respondents. In addition, demographic data (e.g., age, sex, emphasis of graduate study, intervention level, work setting, and service delivery to primary age groups) were compared for Indian and non-Indian respondents. The results provide a unique assessment of current trends in therapeutic approaches used in mental health service delivery with American Indians.

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