Date of Award:

2001

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Gretchen Gimpel

Abstract

Parenting practices are known to be associated with childhood behavior difficulties. Past research has focused on the association between parenting practices and externalizing behavior problems in children. The relationship between internalizing behavioral problems and parenting practices has received less empirical attention. The current study explored the connection between internalizing symptomology in children and parenting practices. Sixty-six parents and children between the ages of 8 and 12 were surveyed regarding internalizing symptomology and parenting practices. Results indicated that parents of children with internalizing symptomology displayed statistically significantly poorer parenting behaviors than did parents of children who were free of internalizing symptoms. Two parenting styles were statistically significantly correlated with internalizing symptoms in children: Overreactivity and lax parenting styles. No significant interaction was noted among gender, internalizing symptomology, and parenting practices. Clinical findings may suggest that parent training may be warranted for children with internalizing symptomology.

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Psychology Commons

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