Date of Award:

8-2020

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Advisor/Chair:

Todd Moon

Co-Advisor/Chair:

Jacob Gunther

Third Advisor:

Reyhan Baktur

Abstract

Locating transmitters is a research area that is becoming increasingly relevant as technology advances. It is especially useful for determining the location of livestock, drones, keys, phones, tablets, etc. As a result of this push for locating devices, many algorithms have been developed to determine source locations. Most source location algorithms and techniques rely on a “line of sight”, or a direct path between the source and the receivers to provide accurate results.

Indoor environments pose a challenge to locating transmitters due to the many surfaces that allow radio waves to interact (reflect, refract, and generally distort) with them. Because of the effects of the radio wave interactions, a direct path from the transmitter to the receivers may not be possible inside, increasing the difficulty. This problem is further augmented when the transmitter is transmitting an unknown signal in an unknown environment.

This research derives algorithms to address these issues. The algorithms are tested via simulations and real-world environmental testing.

Checksum

40587454cf4df7bea1f79a3d9eab5350

Share

COinS