Date of Award:

8-2020

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Arts (MA)

Department:

History

Committee Chair(s)

Frances Titchener

Committee

Frances Titchener

Committee

Seth Archer

Committee

Susan Cogan

Committee

Gabriele Ciciurkaite

Abstract

Research surrounding cultural identity and food customs throughout history are published often, but any research that attempts to combine the two are often based in more recent history. Few combinations of the two are available, and fewer explore the implications within ancient colonization and expansion.

The research for this thesis was conducted with three viewpoints in mind: the colonization of Britannia from Romans within the new colony, the colonization from the native Briton’s perspective, and the Roman citizens within Britannia at the end of Rome’s military involvement with the colony. This method was chosen because in the early years of Britannia acting as a colony, there was much divide between the people emigrating in and the local populations, and by the end of Rome’s official involvement, several hundred years later, the population was almost entirely homogenous and therefore was more easily seen in contrast with the Roman Empire.

The nature of this research indicates that recent trends within historical study to understand the effects of colonization on modern civilizations can be used to effectively explore parts of the further past that otherwise would not be examined.

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History Commons

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