Date of Award:

8-2020

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Special Education and Rehabilitation

Committee Chair(s)

Sarah Pinkelman (Co-Chair), Tyra P. Sellers (Co-Chair)

Committee

Sarah Pinkelman

Committee

Tyra P. Sellers

Committee

Ronnie Detrich

Committee

Timothy A. Slocum

Committee

Tyler Renshaw

Abstract

Feedback is a commonly used intervention to address performance issues in a number of settings. Most research on feedback has focused on manipulating parameters surrounding the delivery of feedback. However, the interaction between those delivering the feedback and a feedback recipient may also influence the impact of performance feedback. The current study investigated the efficacy of training individuals to receive feedback in an appropriate manner using a computer-based training format. Following computer-based training, participants exhibited increases in accuracy of appropriate feedback behaviors when compared to baseline. Participants also demonstrated slight increases in performance on primary job tasks. This study extends the application of computer-based trainings to a new and complex set of behaviors. This study also discusses how computer-based training may increase training efficiency when applied to settings where a sizable portion of an organization needs to be trained in certain skills when compared to traditional in-person training formats. This study extends the research line of training appropriate feedback reception skills.

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f50dca7a8263d9421244cee42568a4d1

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