Date of Award:

12-2021

Document Type:

Dissertation

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Education

Committee Chair(s)

Max L. Longhurst

Committee

Max L. Longhurst

Committee

Suzanne H. Jones

Committee

Steven P. Camicia

Committee

Alyson L. Lavigne

Committee

Brian K. Warnick

Abstract

Over the last several decades there have been federal movements in education which place more accountability on schools and consequently their principals. Principals have many responsibilities which vary from administrative duties to improving teaching in their schools. As a result, principals are often asked to do more than they believe they have time to accomplish. Peer-to-peer feedback is a practice that principals can use to help evaluate, and more importantly, help teachers improve their teachers’ teaching. This multi-case or multi-school qualitative study researched the practice of peer-to-peer feedback at two elementary schools. The purpose was to understand how peer-to-peer feedback informs teacher efficacy, or a teachers’ self-beliefs to be successful, and the factors which are contributing to those self-beliefs. Interviews, focus groups, and journal responses were used to gather data from participating teachers and the principals. In Case 1 there were three participants, and in Case 2 there were six participants. Both cases or schools have evidence to suggest that teacher efficacy is informed positively by peer-to-peer feedback. The shared factors between the two schools were support, improved teaching, and more joy. This provides more data that peer-to-peer feedback can be used in the future to inform teacher efficacy positively, and also highlights the need to do more research in this field.

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