Date of Award:

12-2021

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling

Committee Chair(s)

Ray Joslyn

Committee

Ray Joslyn

Committee

Karen Hager-Martinez

Committee

Summer Gunn

Abstract

Children receiving special education are often exposed to a variety of learning strategies. Care providers may use an array of different strategies when describing therapeutic approaches to parents (including the use of technical or layman terminology), and research has indicated that the use of technical terminology may influence individuals’ perceptions of behavior therapy. This study examined the use of behavioral and layman terminology and video models to see if it affected parents’ preference between Discrete Trial Teaching, and Naturalistic Teaching. Participants were parents with children receiving special education services between the ages of 2-5 years old. Data were collected by using a survey to record parents' responses to various questions regarding the use of behavioral interventions. The results of the study showed that parents generally preferred Naturalistic Teaching in all three conditions, the use of behavioral jargon had little impact on parent preference, and the video models appeared to have a substantial impact on parent preference.

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