Date of Award

8-2018

Degree Type

Creative Project

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Kinesiology and Health Science

First Advisor

Chris Dakin

Second Advisor

Eadric Bressel

Third Advisor

Dave Bolton

Abstract

As our bodies are exposed to whole-body vibration inertial and strain sensitive sensory receptors throughout our body are activated. The information relayed from these receptors to the central nervous system and brain is used to analyze our environment and coordinate movement. The aim of this study was to investigate whether extended duration whole-body vibration influences sensory adaptation and coordinated movement, specifically our joint position acuity immediately following vibration exposure. Twenty-five adults completed a between ankle joint matching task before and immediately following a 20-minute whole-body vibration session and a control session of 20 minutes of standing near, but not on the vibration plate. The joint matching task consisted of moving the participants left ankle to one of four selected angles (10°, 15°, 20°, 25°), having them hold it at that position and match the angle with their right ankle. The foot was positioned at each angle three times to total 12 trials to complete the matching task. The set joint angle and “matched” joint angles were measured using digital goniometers. There was a significant interaction and differences in baseline measurements between control and vibration sessions masking any joint matching acuity changes that may have arisen from whole body vibration exposure.

Included in

Motor Control Commons

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