Author Information

Andreas MalcherekFollow

Start Date

2018 11:10 AM

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Abstract

In 1717 Johannes Poleni (Poleni, 1717) published a book called De motu aquae mixto which we nowadays is cited as the origin of the famous Poleni weir formula. This book contained two separate booklets: The first booklet is on a general discharge theory for a water body consisting of a blocked dead water height at the bottom and a free flowing vivid water column above that dead water column. Examples for such a situation are the overflow over a weir or over dunes or the flow from deeper coastal water into a shallow tidal lagoon. He conducted several experiments using a well-designed device and derived by fitting his data a general discharge formulation depending on the dead and vivid water heights. In the following history of hydraulics the dependency on the dead water i.e. the weir height was forgotten and the Poleni formula is only cited in the form as we know it today.

Share

COinS
 
May 16th, 11:10 AM

300 Years ‘de Motu Aquae Mixto’: What Poleni Really Wrote and a New Overflow Theory Based on Momentum Balance

In 1717 Johannes Poleni (Poleni, 1717) published a book called De motu aquae mixto which we nowadays is cited as the origin of the famous Poleni weir formula. This book contained two separate booklets: The first booklet is on a general discharge theory for a water body consisting of a blocked dead water height at the bottom and a free flowing vivid water column above that dead water column. Examples for such a situation are the overflow over a weir or over dunes or the flow from deeper coastal water into a shallow tidal lagoon. He conducted several experiments using a well-designed device and derived by fitting his data a general discharge formulation depending on the dead and vivid water heights. In the following history of hydraulics the dependency on the dead water i.e. the weir height was forgotten and the Poleni formula is only cited in the form as we know it today.