Start Date

2018 1:50 PM

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Abstract

Most of the storm surge event affected the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia has produced significantly high water levels thus caused severe flooding and destruction to coastal mitigation structures. Analysis of 28 years span of recorded water level data (1986 to 2013), from southern coast of Thailand to south-eastern coast of Peninsular Malaysia, show that the surge level is higher in the 80’s and started to decline in late 90’s and slowly increasing later in the twentieth century. Maximum surge is recorded in 1988 at Paknam Bangnara station in southern region of Thailand (max. storm surge, SSmax = 1.42 m) and Geting (SSmax = 0.93 m) in the north-eastern region of Peninsular Malaysia which resulted in high erosion rate along these coasts. This paper explores the consequences of storm surge increment on the vulnerability of present coastal resources and shoreline protection structures along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The study reveals an increasing magnitude of storm surge and mean sea level increment in all the stations over the years which conform with the sea level rise assessment in IPCC AR5. Storm surge trends and the correlation between the stations are also investigated. A storm surge return levels corresponding to various return periods are derived as a guideline for engineers and developers to determine the optimum level in their design.

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May 17th, 1:50 PM

Historical Storm Surges: Consequences on Coastal Resources and Shoreline Protection in East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia

Most of the storm surge event affected the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia has produced significantly high water levels thus caused severe flooding and destruction to coastal mitigation structures. Analysis of 28 years span of recorded water level data (1986 to 2013), from southern coast of Thailand to south-eastern coast of Peninsular Malaysia, show that the surge level is higher in the 80’s and started to decline in late 90’s and slowly increasing later in the twentieth century. Maximum surge is recorded in 1988 at Paknam Bangnara station in southern region of Thailand (max. storm surge, SSmax = 1.42 m) and Geting (SSmax = 0.93 m) in the north-eastern region of Peninsular Malaysia which resulted in high erosion rate along these coasts. This paper explores the consequences of storm surge increment on the vulnerability of present coastal resources and shoreline protection structures along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The study reveals an increasing magnitude of storm surge and mean sea level increment in all the stations over the years which conform with the sea level rise assessment in IPCC AR5. Storm surge trends and the correlation between the stations are also investigated. A storm surge return levels corresponding to various return periods are derived as a guideline for engineers and developers to determine the optimum level in their design.