Event Title

Ecosystem Flux Response Due to a Bark Beetle Epidemic at the Glees-Ameriflux Site

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

6-22-2009 12:00 AM

End Date

6-26-2009 12:00 AM

Description

GLEES (the Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site) is located in the Snowy Range of the Medicine Bow National Forest, WY, and is managed by the Rocky Mountain Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service (Fort Collins, CO). One of the long-term research projects is the GLEES-AmeriFlux site where measurements of energy and trace gas fluxes between the Engelmann spruce-subalpine fir forest and the surrounding atmosphere have been made continuously since 1999. The eddy-covariance technique is used to measure the exchange (fluxes) of carbon-dioxide, water vapor, sensible heat, and momentum between the atmosphere and the subalpine ecosystem. A current epidemic of spruce beetle and western balsam bark beetle is killing the majority of mature trees surrounding the AmeriFlux scaffold. The flux-data are used to follow changes in the net ecosystem production, the water cycle, and the energy balance due to beetle-induced tree mortality.

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Jun 22nd, 12:00 AM Jun 26th, 12:00 AM

Ecosystem Flux Response Due to a Bark Beetle Epidemic at the Glees-Ameriflux Site

GLEES (the Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiments Site) is located in the Snowy Range of the Medicine Bow National Forest, WY, and is managed by the Rocky Mountain Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service (Fort Collins, CO). One of the long-term research projects is the GLEES-AmeriFlux site where measurements of energy and trace gas fluxes between the Engelmann spruce-subalpine fir forest and the surrounding atmosphere have been made continuously since 1999. The eddy-covariance technique is used to measure the exchange (fluxes) of carbon-dioxide, water vapor, sensible heat, and momentum between the atmosphere and the subalpine ecosystem. A current epidemic of spruce beetle and western balsam bark beetle is killing the majority of mature trees surrounding the AmeriFlux scaffold. The flux-data are used to follow changes in the net ecosystem production, the water cycle, and the energy balance due to beetle-induced tree mortality.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/posters/17