Event Title

Classification and Analysis of Tree Hole Occurrence in a Northeast Temperate Forest System

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

6-22-2009 12:00 AM

End Date

6-26-2009 12:00 AM

Description

This study examined the types, formation and abundance of tree holes in northeastern US forest stands. Tree holes are water filled depressions on trees that harbor macroinvertebrate communities. They have often been used as microcosms for detrital and population dynamic research, but there have been no published studies on factors that affect tree hole incidence in forest stands. We studied tree holes in stands ranging from CT to northern NH. Distance sampling was used to estimate abundance of tree holes on a per-hectare basis. A mixed-effects logistic regression analysis was used to form model predictors of factors that best predicted tree hole occurrence. Tree species, stand basal area, and diameter at breast height were identified to be the most influential model predictors for determining tree hole occurrence. Tree holes occurred almost exclusively on hardwoods, with maples being most prone to tree holes. Pans and rot holes are the best descriptors for the types of hole formation; however, pans most often give way to a rot lined hole. Rot holes were the most common types of holes discovered and both pans and rot formed holes developed a rot lining. Leaf litter was found in nearly all tree holes, regardless of tree species. Leaf litter has been identified as a dominant nutrient base and composition of leaf litter is most often associated with the tree on which the hole is associated. Tree holes have been recognized to have a role in vector ecology, as they are a breeding site of mosquitoes capable of carrying infectious diseases. Understanding tree hole occurrence and formation is useful for microcosm research and has future applications in patterning vector-borne infectious diseases.

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Jun 22nd, 12:00 AM Jun 26th, 12:00 AM

Classification and Analysis of Tree Hole Occurrence in a Northeast Temperate Forest System

This study examined the types, formation and abundance of tree holes in northeastern US forest stands. Tree holes are water filled depressions on trees that harbor macroinvertebrate communities. They have often been used as microcosms for detrital and population dynamic research, but there have been no published studies on factors that affect tree hole incidence in forest stands. We studied tree holes in stands ranging from CT to northern NH. Distance sampling was used to estimate abundance of tree holes on a per-hectare basis. A mixed-effects logistic regression analysis was used to form model predictors of factors that best predicted tree hole occurrence. Tree species, stand basal area, and diameter at breast height were identified to be the most influential model predictors for determining tree hole occurrence. Tree holes occurred almost exclusively on hardwoods, with maples being most prone to tree holes. Pans and rot holes are the best descriptors for the types of hole formation; however, pans most often give way to a rot lined hole. Rot holes were the most common types of holes discovered and both pans and rot formed holes developed a rot lining. Leaf litter was found in nearly all tree holes, regardless of tree species. Leaf litter has been identified as a dominant nutrient base and composition of leaf litter is most often associated with the tree on which the hole is associated. Tree holes have been recognized to have a role in vector ecology, as they are a breeding site of mosquitoes capable of carrying infectious diseases. Understanding tree hole occurrence and formation is useful for microcosm research and has future applications in patterning vector-borne infectious diseases.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/posters/19