Event Title

Ecosystem recovery after disturbance: thresholds for biodiversity and resiliency indicators

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

6-24-2009 11:10 AM

End Date

6-24-2009 11:30 AM

Description

This project uses long-term (20 yr) research installations established and maintained by the BC Ministry of Forests and Range and that extend across north-central British Columbia, Canada. Vegetation structure (% cover and height) was measured at regular intervals (1, 2, 3, 5, 10 and 20 yrs) after clearcut or slashburning disturbances. These measurements are being used to develop indicators of biodiversity (composition, richness and biomass) and define response curves for measuring ecological resilience of Sub-boreal Spruce, Engelmann Spruce-Subalpine Fir, and Interior Cedar Hemlock forest ecosystems. We hypothesize that the rate of recovery, as measured by the three biodiversity indicators, varies significantly among ecosystems and across environmental gradients. We also expect that site productivity and the historical fire regime are important in determining vegetation recovery rates after burns of varying severity. To test these hypotheses, we will use post-burn vegetation repeated measures and environmental data collected in the summers of 2007/08 to develop a structural equation model. Our model will be tested using plant community composition first by species and then according to plant functional types. This research will support BC’s Future Forest Ecosystems Initiative, which aims to protect and enhance the resilience of BC’s forests through an adaptive management strategy.

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Jun 24th, 11:10 AM Jun 24th, 11:30 AM

Ecosystem recovery after disturbance: thresholds for biodiversity and resiliency indicators

This project uses long-term (20 yr) research installations established and maintained by the BC Ministry of Forests and Range and that extend across north-central British Columbia, Canada. Vegetation structure (% cover and height) was measured at regular intervals (1, 2, 3, 5, 10 and 20 yrs) after clearcut or slashburning disturbances. These measurements are being used to develop indicators of biodiversity (composition, richness and biomass) and define response curves for measuring ecological resilience of Sub-boreal Spruce, Engelmann Spruce-Subalpine Fir, and Interior Cedar Hemlock forest ecosystems. We hypothesize that the rate of recovery, as measured by the three biodiversity indicators, varies significantly among ecosystems and across environmental gradients. We also expect that site productivity and the historical fire regime are important in determining vegetation recovery rates after burns of varying severity. To test these hypotheses, we will use post-burn vegetation repeated measures and environmental data collected in the summers of 2007/08 to develop a structural equation model. Our model will be tested using plant community composition first by species and then according to plant functional types. This research will support BC’s Future Forest Ecosystems Initiative, which aims to protect and enhance the resilience of BC’s forests through an adaptive management strategy.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/recovery/11