Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Dynamics of Srs2 movement along single stranded DNA

Presenter Information

Dan MorrisFollow

Class

Article

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty Mentor

Edwin Antony

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Cells use Homologous recombination (HR) to repair double stranded DNA breaks. When there is a double stranded break in the DNA, rather than reattaching the broken pieces of DNA, the cell will compare the broken strand to the homologous copy of DNA and use it as a template to complete repair. A protein called Rad51 is the central engine for HR and forms a filament on DNA to promote HR. But, too much HR is also bad for the cell as it will cause chromosome rearrangements. The cells control when and where Rad51 functions by removing it from unwanted places in the DNA. This is accomplished by a protein called Srs2. Srs2 moves along the DNA and remove Rad51, a role analogous to a wire stripper. My research seeks to understand the dynamics of Srs2 and Rad51 so as to better understand their roles in DNA repair. We have uncovered the speed of Srs2 movement on the DNA and how much ATP is used in the movement. This study gives a quantitative measure of Srs2 sliding, forward & backward movement and pausing while moving along the DNA. Using this information, we will put together a mechanism for Srs2 movement on DNA as it works to remove the Rad51 filament on DNA. Ultimately, this helps us understand why mutations in protein like Srs2 and Rad51 lead to the onset of cancer.

Start Date

4-9-2015 1:30 PM

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Apr 9th, 1:30 PM

Dynamics of Srs2 movement along single stranded DNA

Cells use Homologous recombination (HR) to repair double stranded DNA breaks. When there is a double stranded break in the DNA, rather than reattaching the broken pieces of DNA, the cell will compare the broken strand to the homologous copy of DNA and use it as a template to complete repair. A protein called Rad51 is the central engine for HR and forms a filament on DNA to promote HR. But, too much HR is also bad for the cell as it will cause chromosome rearrangements. The cells control when and where Rad51 functions by removing it from unwanted places in the DNA. This is accomplished by a protein called Srs2. Srs2 moves along the DNA and remove Rad51, a role analogous to a wire stripper. My research seeks to understand the dynamics of Srs2 and Rad51 so as to better understand their roles in DNA repair. We have uncovered the speed of Srs2 movement on the DNA and how much ATP is used in the movement. This study gives a quantitative measure of Srs2 sliding, forward & backward movement and pausing while moving along the DNA. Using this information, we will put together a mechanism for Srs2 movement on DNA as it works to remove the Rad51 filament on DNA. Ultimately, this helps us understand why mutations in protein like Srs2 and Rad51 lead to the onset of cancer.