Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Assessing Natural Seed Dormancy Loss in Alkali Bulrush (Bolboschoenus maritimus): Duck Ingestion and Natural Cold Stratification

Presenter Information

Bret MossmanFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources

Department

Wildland Resources Department

Faculty Mentor

Karin Kettenring

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Waterfowl have been shown to be important dispersers of different species of aquatic plants and the ingestion of seeds by waterfowl can affect seed dormancy loss. Additionally, it has been found that cold stratification is an effective means of initiating dormancy loss in aquatic plants but the relative effectiveness of cold stratification vs. duck ingestion requires further evaluation. Wetlands in the Great Salt Lake ecosystem provide crucial breeding, foraging, and stop over sites for migrating birds. Invasive Phragmites australis has caused a large loss of these wetlands. Wetland managers are actively controlling these invaders but native species are not returning and must be reintroduced by managers. Due to deeply dormant seeds, managers need guidance on which environmental factors affect seed dormancy to aid in restoration of a key habitat species—alkali bulrush (Bolboschoenus maritimus). This project evaluates the effects of duck ingestion and natural cold stratification on alkali bulrush seed dormancy. We looked specifically at comparisons between germination from seeds removed from mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and green-winged teal (Anas crecca) gizzards and—for a test cold stratification—seeds placed in Great Salt Lake wetlands within the water column, buried in flooded sediment, and kept in a non-flooded area. Seeds were cold stratified October – December 2016. Seeds were collected from the gizzards of hunter harvested ducks December 10, 2016 to January 10, 2017 during which 15 mallards and 8 green-winged teal gizzards containing alkali bulrush were collected. Cold stratified samples were also removed during this interval. Seeds within flooded sediment germinated at the highest percentage (~38%) followed by mallard samples, green-winged teal, water samples and finally non-flooded samples. Managers can use the information in this study to better understand how management action can be altered to maximize dormancy loss in both existing bulrush stands and within active restorations.

Location

Room 208

Start Date

4-13-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 10:15 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 9:00 AM Apr 13th, 10:15 AM

Assessing Natural Seed Dormancy Loss in Alkali Bulrush (Bolboschoenus maritimus): Duck Ingestion and Natural Cold Stratification

Room 208

Waterfowl have been shown to be important dispersers of different species of aquatic plants and the ingestion of seeds by waterfowl can affect seed dormancy loss. Additionally, it has been found that cold stratification is an effective means of initiating dormancy loss in aquatic plants but the relative effectiveness of cold stratification vs. duck ingestion requires further evaluation. Wetlands in the Great Salt Lake ecosystem provide crucial breeding, foraging, and stop over sites for migrating birds. Invasive Phragmites australis has caused a large loss of these wetlands. Wetland managers are actively controlling these invaders but native species are not returning and must be reintroduced by managers. Due to deeply dormant seeds, managers need guidance on which environmental factors affect seed dormancy to aid in restoration of a key habitat species—alkali bulrush (Bolboschoenus maritimus). This project evaluates the effects of duck ingestion and natural cold stratification on alkali bulrush seed dormancy. We looked specifically at comparisons between germination from seeds removed from mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and green-winged teal (Anas crecca) gizzards and—for a test cold stratification—seeds placed in Great Salt Lake wetlands within the water column, buried in flooded sediment, and kept in a non-flooded area. Seeds were cold stratified October – December 2016. Seeds were collected from the gizzards of hunter harvested ducks December 10, 2016 to January 10, 2017 during which 15 mallards and 8 green-winged teal gizzards containing alkali bulrush were collected. Cold stratified samples were also removed during this interval. Seeds within flooded sediment germinated at the highest percentage (~38%) followed by mallard samples, green-winged teal, water samples and finally non-flooded samples. Managers can use the information in this study to better understand how management action can be altered to maximize dormancy loss in both existing bulrush stands and within active restorations.