Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Effects in Mice of Medium Chain Triglycerides During a State of Endotoxemia

Presenter Information

David DangFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences

Department

Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Sciences Department

Faculty Mentor

Robert Ward

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Among certain health groups there has been a growing trend in the addition of medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) into the diet. This has been driven by the assumption MCTs provide a novel, energy source, compared to triglycerides with long-chained fatty acids. It has been shown in several animal models that MCTs have a protective effect against gut and hepatic inflammation and that they reduce insulin resistance and maintain body fat content in a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of MCT in the diet while under a stress-induced inflammatory response in mice. It was hypothesized that the addition of MCT in a standard chow diet would be protective, in terms of survival, against septic shock stress.

Mice (C57BL/6, n=24) were fed either a standard AIN-76 chow diet (5.0% fat from corn oil) or an MCT added diet (2.5% fat from MCT oil and 2.5% fat from corn oil). Glucose sensitivity was measured using an oral glucose tolerance test (2 g/kg) while lean body mass and body fat content were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both of which were measured at the beginning of the experimental trial and at week 6 before the endotoxemia-inducing injection (intraperitoneal) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg).

Within 24 hours of LPS injection there was 0% survival of all subjects among both diets. Subsequent analysis included: red blood cell lipid metabolism using GC-FID and a metabolomic profile was established using GC-MS. In conclusion, the current data suggests that the addition of MCT in a normal chow diet may not have a protective effect against LPS-induced endotoxemia. Further analysis will look at the effects of MCT on the colon, gut microbiome, permeability of the gut, liver, and skeletal muscle in order to study any systemic effects.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Effects in Mice of Medium Chain Triglycerides During a State of Endotoxemia

North Atrium

Among certain health groups there has been a growing trend in the addition of medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) into the diet. This has been driven by the assumption MCTs provide a novel, energy source, compared to triglycerides with long-chained fatty acids. It has been shown in several animal models that MCTs have a protective effect against gut and hepatic inflammation and that they reduce insulin resistance and maintain body fat content in a high fat diet. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of MCT in the diet while under a stress-induced inflammatory response in mice. It was hypothesized that the addition of MCT in a standard chow diet would be protective, in terms of survival, against septic shock stress.

Mice (C57BL/6, n=24) were fed either a standard AIN-76 chow diet (5.0% fat from corn oil) or an MCT added diet (2.5% fat from MCT oil and 2.5% fat from corn oil). Glucose sensitivity was measured using an oral glucose tolerance test (2 g/kg) while lean body mass and body fat content were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both of which were measured at the beginning of the experimental trial and at week 6 before the endotoxemia-inducing injection (intraperitoneal) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg).

Within 24 hours of LPS injection there was 0% survival of all subjects among both diets. Subsequent analysis included: red blood cell lipid metabolism using GC-FID and a metabolomic profile was established using GC-MS. In conclusion, the current data suggests that the addition of MCT in a normal chow diet may not have a protective effect against LPS-induced endotoxemia. Further analysis will look at the effects of MCT on the colon, gut microbiome, permeability of the gut, liver, and skeletal muscle in order to study any systemic effects.