Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Shigella Spa47 Regulator Proteins Provide a Potential Means of Controlling Type Three Secretion System Activation and Pathogen Virulence

Presenter Information

Heather JonesFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Science

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry Department

Faculty Mentor

Nick Dickenson

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Shigella flexneri is a gram negative bacterial pathogen and is the causative agent of bacillary dysentery. Like many related pathogens, Shigella uses a type three secretion system (T3SS) to infect targeted host cells and avoid host immune responses. Within the T3SS, we have identified the protein Spa47 as an active ATPase that is essential for apparatus formation and the ability of Shigella to cause infection. Specifically, Spa47 knockout and or mutant strains of Shigella are non-virulent while complemented strains regain virulence, suggesting that control over of Spa47 activity may ultimately serve to regulate Shigella virulence in vivo. In this study, we identify and characterize Shigella proteins that interact with Spa47 and find that these interactions do in fact serve to regulate Spa47 activity in vitro, providing valuable insight into the mechanism of Shigella virulence regulation and providing a valuable target for much needed non-antibiotic based anti-infective treatments.

Location

South Atrium

Start Date

4-13-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

4-13-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Shigella Spa47 Regulator Proteins Provide a Potential Means of Controlling Type Three Secretion System Activation and Pathogen Virulence

South Atrium

Shigella flexneri is a gram negative bacterial pathogen and is the causative agent of bacillary dysentery. Like many related pathogens, Shigella uses a type three secretion system (T3SS) to infect targeted host cells and avoid host immune responses. Within the T3SS, we have identified the protein Spa47 as an active ATPase that is essential for apparatus formation and the ability of Shigella to cause infection. Specifically, Spa47 knockout and or mutant strains of Shigella are non-virulent while complemented strains regain virulence, suggesting that control over of Spa47 activity may ultimately serve to regulate Shigella virulence in vivo. In this study, we identify and characterize Shigella proteins that interact with Spa47 and find that these interactions do in fact serve to regulate Spa47 activity in vitro, providing valuable insight into the mechanism of Shigella virulence regulation and providing a valuable target for much needed non-antibiotic based anti-infective treatments.