Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Ethical Housing: Low-income Dwellings for At-Risk Single Mothers

Class

Article

College

Caine College of the Arts

Faculty Mentor

Susie Tibbits

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

In the in 2017, according to the US Census Bureau, there were 11,667,000 single parent families living in the United States. Of those, 9,497,000 were headed by mothers. Furthermore, 3,380,932 of these single mother families were considered poor. Where can these mothers take their children when they can no longer afford standard housing? Do they move into lower-rent areas and risk the welfare and well-being of their children? While low-income housing developments do exist, the nicest and safest ones fill up immediately, and often have a waiting list of up to two years. This project saught to develop a solution to this problem. The ultimate goal of the design was to create an apartment complex that can serve as a template to be applied to similar developments in poverty-stricken cities where the amount of at-risk single mothers is highest. This project showcases the first development in Chicago, Illinois; where 28% of children under 18 live in poverty. This development serves not only as a shelter, but as a community. It’s communal area also functions as a hub for amenities such as a daycare, class rooms, a library, and exercise room. It is imperative that the development serves a place of protection and healing for these mothers while they build a better life for themselves and their children.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 10:15 AM

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:15 AM

Ethical Housing: Low-income Dwellings for At-Risk Single Mothers

The South Atrium

In the in 2017, according to the US Census Bureau, there were 11,667,000 single parent families living in the United States. Of those, 9,497,000 were headed by mothers. Furthermore, 3,380,932 of these single mother families were considered poor. Where can these mothers take their children when they can no longer afford standard housing? Do they move into lower-rent areas and risk the welfare and well-being of their children? While low-income housing developments do exist, the nicest and safest ones fill up immediately, and often have a waiting list of up to two years. This project saught to develop a solution to this problem. The ultimate goal of the design was to create an apartment complex that can serve as a template to be applied to similar developments in poverty-stricken cities where the amount of at-risk single mothers is highest. This project showcases the first development in Chicago, Illinois; where 28% of children under 18 live in poverty. This development serves not only as a shelter, but as a community. It’s communal area also functions as a hub for amenities such as a daycare, class rooms, a library, and exercise room. It is imperative that the development serves a place of protection and healing for these mothers while they build a better life for themselves and their children.