Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Every Day Monuments

Class

Article

College

Caine College of the Arts

Faculty Mentor

Susie Tibbitts

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Picturesque tree lined streets, and the eclectic mingling of architectural styles from a bygone era are what draw many people to historic districts and vintage suburbs across the nation. As one tours these old neighborhoods, one can find a vast expanse of historic architectural styles ranging from exuberantly decorated Victorians, to Craftsman Bungalows and the emergence of modernism. Great lengths have been put into place to protect architectural landmarks built for historically prominent people, or properties designed by influential architects. But what about the quaint Gothic Revival cottage built for the dress maker, the local bakers foursquare on Center Street, or the Tudor Revival for the town banker? These humble monuments to the working men and women who contributed to our society also deserve careful preservation and restoration. Too often these architecturally rich dwellings fall subject to misguided additions, cheap makeovers, and uninformed design alterations that destroy the original art, beauty, and intent of these structures, obliterating the history, meaning, and architectural significance they have to offer. The residential suburbs of Logan, Utah, are filled with charming period homes that range from immaculately maintained, to neglected and forgotten, and even “remuddled” and mutilated. The purpose of this project is to highlight the architectural styles from the founding of Logan to the 1940’s in the Cache Valley area. Each section begins by highlighting a period style, giving a brief history of the political, economic, and artistic history and inspiration behind that style. Examples of stylistically correct details are contrasted with illustrations of misguided modifications. With clear “do this, not that” instructions, this work will serve as a resource to help the most uninformed home owners and professionals alike update, restore, and even add on to local buildings while still maintaining their original beauty,

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 10:15 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:00 AM Apr 12th, 10:15 AM

Every Day Monuments

The South Atrium

Picturesque tree lined streets, and the eclectic mingling of architectural styles from a bygone era are what draw many people to historic districts and vintage suburbs across the nation. As one tours these old neighborhoods, one can find a vast expanse of historic architectural styles ranging from exuberantly decorated Victorians, to Craftsman Bungalows and the emergence of modernism. Great lengths have been put into place to protect architectural landmarks built for historically prominent people, or properties designed by influential architects. But what about the quaint Gothic Revival cottage built for the dress maker, the local bakers foursquare on Center Street, or the Tudor Revival for the town banker? These humble monuments to the working men and women who contributed to our society also deserve careful preservation and restoration. Too often these architecturally rich dwellings fall subject to misguided additions, cheap makeovers, and uninformed design alterations that destroy the original art, beauty, and intent of these structures, obliterating the history, meaning, and architectural significance they have to offer. The residential suburbs of Logan, Utah, are filled with charming period homes that range from immaculately maintained, to neglected and forgotten, and even “remuddled” and mutilated. The purpose of this project is to highlight the architectural styles from the founding of Logan to the 1940’s in the Cache Valley area. Each section begins by highlighting a period style, giving a brief history of the political, economic, and artistic history and inspiration behind that style. Examples of stylistically correct details are contrasted with illustrations of misguided modifications. With clear “do this, not that” instructions, this work will serve as a resource to help the most uninformed home owners and professionals alike update, restore, and even add on to local buildings while still maintaining their original beauty,