Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Generational Gap of Geographically Displaced U.S. Caribbean Families

Class

Article

College

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Crescencio López González

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This research focuses on analyzing the diaspora of two specific cultures, the Cuban Americans and the Dominican Americans, and their dislocation from their countries of origin to the United States. Our literary analysis reveals the multiple difficulties and obstacles these families face in creating new lives for themselves. Many traditions and cultural facets are not carried over during the integration and assimilation into the U.S. mainstream culture due to the pressure these families feel to fit in. Family unity within the Latino culture is altered across seas and borders, affecting subsequent generations. Our cultural and literary analysis takes into considerations the works of two prominent Latinx Caribbean authors; Loida Maritza Pérez's Geographies of Home and Christina García's Dreaming in Cuban. The study of these novels concentrates on the interpretation of the symbolic realities lived by the characters and how the multiple adverse conditions shaped the characters experiences. Utilizing Latinx urban theory on the processes of integration and assimilation, our research scrutinizes the critical role that family customs and beliefs play in individuals' lives. It also highlights how family loyalty is essential to families affected by this diaspora, the lack thereof only leading to further distress in the midst of challenges these families face in a new country.

Location

The South Atrium

Start Date

4-12-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

4-12-2018 1:15 PM

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

Generational Gap of Geographically Displaced U.S. Caribbean Families

The South Atrium

This research focuses on analyzing the diaspora of two specific cultures, the Cuban Americans and the Dominican Americans, and their dislocation from their countries of origin to the United States. Our literary analysis reveals the multiple difficulties and obstacles these families face in creating new lives for themselves. Many traditions and cultural facets are not carried over during the integration and assimilation into the U.S. mainstream culture due to the pressure these families feel to fit in. Family unity within the Latino culture is altered across seas and borders, affecting subsequent generations. Our cultural and literary analysis takes into considerations the works of two prominent Latinx Caribbean authors; Loida Maritza Pérez's Geographies of Home and Christina García's Dreaming in Cuban. The study of these novels concentrates on the interpretation of the symbolic realities lived by the characters and how the multiple adverse conditions shaped the characters experiences. Utilizing Latinx urban theory on the processes of integration and assimilation, our research scrutinizes the critical role that family customs and beliefs play in individuals' lives. It also highlights how family loyalty is essential to families affected by this diaspora, the lack thereof only leading to further distress in the midst of challenges these families face in a new country.