Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Doctoral Students’ Faculty and Peer Interaction Patterns: Relationships to Researcher Self-Efficacy and Skill Acquisition

Class

Article

College

Emma Eccles Jones College of Education and Human Services

Faculty Mentor

David Feldon

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Using a national sample of 336 biology students, this study aimed (1) to classify doctpresentation students’ faculty and peer interaction patterns and (2) to investigate associations between students’ interaction classification and their demographic characteristics, research self-efficacy, and research performance. The findings revealed three distinct doctpresentation student faculty and peer interaction patterns throughout students’ second year of doctpresentation training: (a) high interaction with faculty and peers, (b) high interaction with peers only, and (c) low interaction with faculty and peers. Further, clear differences in class membership were apparent as a function of international student status. In addition, the association of greatest growth in research skills with high peer-only interaction provides a surprising reflection of the importance of peers in skill development.

Location

Room 154

Start Date

4-12-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

4-12-2018 11:45 AM

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Apr 12th, 10:30 AM Apr 12th, 11:45 AM

Doctoral Students’ Faculty and Peer Interaction Patterns: Relationships to Researcher Self-Efficacy and Skill Acquisition

Room 154

Using a national sample of 336 biology students, this study aimed (1) to classify doctpresentation students’ faculty and peer interaction patterns and (2) to investigate associations between students’ interaction classification and their demographic characteristics, research self-efficacy, and research performance. The findings revealed three distinct doctpresentation student faculty and peer interaction patterns throughout students’ second year of doctpresentation training: (a) high interaction with faculty and peers, (b) high interaction with peers only, and (c) low interaction with faculty and peers. Further, clear differences in class membership were apparent as a function of international student status. In addition, the association of greatest growth in research skills with high peer-only interaction provides a surprising reflection of the importance of peers in skill development.