Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

The Social Justice of Everyday Priority Queues

Class

Article

College

Jon M. Huntsman School of Business

Department

Management Department

Faculty Mentor

Michael Dixon

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

In many capacity constrained systems, customers' wait times lengthen as the demand for service increases and operational resources tighten. In order to combat this, organizations hav started offering transparent queue priority to customers through "fast pass" type access. Through differing mechanisms, organizations have been dedicating resources to priority queues in hope that satisfaction of high-value or high-use customers will increase with the promise of shorter wait times. In this research, we question the assumption that shorter wait times always lead t higher satisfaction in light of procedural justice concerns raised by priority access. Most notably we explore the conditions in which access to a priority queue seems fair or less fair to customer by conducting a case study of an organization that recently deployed a fast pass queue and through a controlled experiment.

Location

Room 155

Start Date

4-10-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

4-10-2019 11:45 AM

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Apr 10th, 10:30 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

The Social Justice of Everyday Priority Queues

Room 155

In many capacity constrained systems, customers' wait times lengthen as the demand for service increases and operational resources tighten. In order to combat this, organizations hav started offering transparent queue priority to customers through "fast pass" type access. Through differing mechanisms, organizations have been dedicating resources to priority queues in hope that satisfaction of high-value or high-use customers will increase with the promise of shorter wait times. In this research, we question the assumption that shorter wait times always lead t higher satisfaction in light of procedural justice concerns raised by priority access. Most notably we explore the conditions in which access to a priority queue seems fair or less fair to customer by conducting a case study of an organization that recently deployed a fast pass queue and through a controlled experiment.