Event Title

There are No Civilians: Species-at-Risk and Energy Development

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

Under the traditional laws of war, a civilian was defined as someone not a member of their countries armed forces or armed militia. Essentially, they were the non-combatants, the innocents; afforded legal protection from the effects of war, and/or military occupation. The 1949 Geneva defined the term combatants to encompass “civilians directly engaged in hostilities and that such persons should be “considered ‘unlawful’ or ‘unprivileged’ combatants.” In 1977 the caveat, “in case of doubt whether a person is a civilian, that person shall be considered to be a civilian” was added. After 10 years at-wars, what constitutes a civilian to the US and Coalition forces remains problematic largely because of the emergence of acts of terrorism where combatants adopt the civilian mantra to muddle the rules-of-engagement. Concomitantly, if species conservation and energy development constitute the Endangered Species Act battleground; can a US public that continues to demand cheap energy and species conservation still be considered a passive on-looker – a civilian?

Terry A. Messmer, Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist, Utah State University Department of Wildland Resources, 5230 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322, terry.messmer@usu.edu

Terry A. Messmer is a Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist in the Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University. Logan. He also is the Director of the Jack H. Berryman Institute, holds the Quinney Professorship of Wildlife Conflict Management in the College of Natural Resources, and is the director of the Utah Community-Based Conservation Program at Utah State University. He received B.S. degrees in Fisheries and Wildlife Management and in Biology from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks; M.S. degrees in Natural Resource Management/Botany and in Regional and Community Planning; and a Ph.D. in Animal and Range Science from North Dakota State University, Fargo. His research, teaching, and extension activities include identification, implementation, and evaluation of conservation strategies, technologies, and partnerships that can benefit agriculture, wildlife, and resource stakeholders. He is particularly interested

in the reevaluation of contemporary fisheries and wildlife management policies and paradigms regarding the contributions private lands to natural resource conservation, wildlife and livestock interactions, and the abatement of human-wildlife conflicts.

Comments

Welcoming comments by Chris Luecke, Dean, Quinney College of Natural Resources, Utah State University, Logan, UT. for the first 3 minutes of the video followed by talk by Terry Messmer

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Oct 30th, 8:00 AM Oct 30th, 8:20 AM

There are No Civilians: Species-at-Risk and Energy Development

USU Eccles Conference Center

Under the traditional laws of war, a civilian was defined as someone not a member of their countries armed forces or armed militia. Essentially, they were the non-combatants, the innocents; afforded legal protection from the effects of war, and/or military occupation. The 1949 Geneva defined the term combatants to encompass “civilians directly engaged in hostilities and that such persons should be “considered ‘unlawful’ or ‘unprivileged’ combatants.” In 1977 the caveat, “in case of doubt whether a person is a civilian, that person shall be considered to be a civilian” was added. After 10 years at-wars, what constitutes a civilian to the US and Coalition forces remains problematic largely because of the emergence of acts of terrorism where combatants adopt the civilian mantra to muddle the rules-of-engagement. Concomitantly, if species conservation and energy development constitute the Endangered Species Act battleground; can a US public that continues to demand cheap energy and species conservation still be considered a passive on-looker – a civilian?

Terry A. Messmer, Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist, Utah State University Department of Wildland Resources, 5230 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322, terry.messmer@usu.edu

Terry A. Messmer is a Professor and Extension Wildlife Specialist in the Department of Wildland Resources, Utah State University. Logan. He also is the Director of the Jack H. Berryman Institute, holds the Quinney Professorship of Wildlife Conflict Management in the College of Natural Resources, and is the director of the Utah Community-Based Conservation Program at Utah State University. He received B.S. degrees in Fisheries and Wildlife Management and in Biology from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks; M.S. degrees in Natural Resource Management/Botany and in Regional and Community Planning; and a Ph.D. in Animal and Range Science from North Dakota State University, Fargo. His research, teaching, and extension activities include identification, implementation, and evaluation of conservation strategies, technologies, and partnerships that can benefit agriculture, wildlife, and resource stakeholders. He is particularly interested

in the reevaluation of contemporary fisheries and wildlife management policies and paradigms regarding the contributions private lands to natural resource conservation, wildlife and livestock interactions, and the abatement of human-wildlife conflicts.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/october30/1