Event Title

Reclamation Planning for Energy Development Projects

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Abstract

Successful reclamation of disturbances associated with energy development can lessen the severity and duration of environmental impacts. Challenges to reclamation in the Rocky Mountain west include limited soil resources, lack of precipitation, and invasive plants. Pre-construction reclamation planning, focusing on salvage of soils suitable for plant growth, is the most beneficial component of the reclamation planning process. The reclamation planning process begins with a pre-disturbance site characterization including an inventory of soil resources and vegetation communities. This information allows development of reclamation plans that specify soil salvage depths, soil treatments, seed mixes, weed management, and monitoring for each site. Implementation of these plans maximizes the amount of suitable soil available for reclamation, which increases re-vegetation success rates. Results from case studies show significant reductions in the time required to meet reclamation goals and restore disturbed land to support prior uses.

Brad Teson, KC Harvey Environmental, LLC, 376 Gallatin Park Drive, Bozeman, MT, 59718, bteson@kcharvey.com

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Oct 31st, 11:00 AM Oct 31st, 12:00 PM

Reclamation Planning for Energy Development Projects

USU Eccles Conference Center

Successful reclamation of disturbances associated with energy development can lessen the severity and duration of environmental impacts. Challenges to reclamation in the Rocky Mountain west include limited soil resources, lack of precipitation, and invasive plants. Pre-construction reclamation planning, focusing on salvage of soils suitable for plant growth, is the most beneficial component of the reclamation planning process. The reclamation planning process begins with a pre-disturbance site characterization including an inventory of soil resources and vegetation communities. This information allows development of reclamation plans that specify soil salvage depths, soil treatments, seed mixes, weed management, and monitoring for each site. Implementation of these plans maximizes the amount of suitable soil available for reclamation, which increases re-vegetation success rates. Results from case studies show significant reductions in the time required to meet reclamation goals and restore disturbed land to support prior uses.

Brad Teson, KC Harvey Environmental, LLC, 376 Gallatin Park Drive, Bozeman, MT, 59718, bteson@kcharvey.com

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/posters/8