Event Title

Integrating Science with Restoration in Colorado's Front Range Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project (CFLRP): some of our greatest hits.

Presenter Information

Jenny Briggs

Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

https://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

In 2010, the USDA Forest Service (USFS) initiated the national 10-year Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) program to increase the pace and scale of ecological restoration efforts in forests with pressing needs for treatment to offset the effects of past anthropogenic stressors. Following several major wildfires, a mountain pine beetle epidemic, and rapid expansion of the wildland-urban interface, the Front Range of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado was one of the first landscapes in the US to receive CFLR funding. Over the past 8 years, CFLR funding has catalyzed efforts by a diverse collaborative group (USFS, other resource managers, scientists, and stakeholders) to implement and monitor restoration treatments in ponderosa-pine dominated forests along the Colorado Front Range. This talk describes the progress and challenges experienced by the collaborative, focusing in particular on how more than 10 scientific studies and monitoring efforts have been developed and integrated – with varying degrees of success! - into both the adaptive management and adaptive monitoring processes.

Comments

Jenny Briggs joined the US Geological Survey in 2008 as a Research Ecologist and works at the interdisciplinary Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center in Denver, Colorado. She holds a B.A. in Human Biology from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Nevada, Reno. Her research investigates the interaction between ecological and anthropogenic disturbances in forested ecosystems. Recently, she has focused on the dynamics of insect epidemics, fire, and forest management (e.g. restoration, fuel reduction, and prescribed burning) in Colorado. She welcomes opportunities to work collaboratively with management agency partners and educators on questions of concern to resource management decisions, and participates in several regional interagency research-management teams that are part of national programs.

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Oct 18th, 10:45 AM Oct 18th, 11:15 AM

Integrating Science with Restoration in Colorado's Front Range Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project (CFLRP): some of our greatest hits.

USU Eccles Conference Center

In 2010, the USDA Forest Service (USFS) initiated the national 10-year Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) program to increase the pace and scale of ecological restoration efforts in forests with pressing needs for treatment to offset the effects of past anthropogenic stressors. Following several major wildfires, a mountain pine beetle epidemic, and rapid expansion of the wildland-urban interface, the Front Range of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado was one of the first landscapes in the US to receive CFLR funding. Over the past 8 years, CFLR funding has catalyzed efforts by a diverse collaborative group (USFS, other resource managers, scientists, and stakeholders) to implement and monitor restoration treatments in ponderosa-pine dominated forests along the Colorado Front Range. This talk describes the progress and challenges experienced by the collaborative, focusing in particular on how more than 10 scientific studies and monitoring efforts have been developed and integrated – with varying degrees of success! - into both the adaptive management and adaptive monitoring processes.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2017/Oct18/3