Event Title

The Effects of Urbanization on Watershed Functions: The Relationship between Impervious Surface Area and Water Quality in Cache County, Utah

Location

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-25-2004 11:40 AM

End Date

3-25-2004 11:45 AM

Description

Impervious surface area (ISA) has emerged in recent years as an important indicator of cumulative water quality impacts to urban watersheds. This study was conducted to test relationships between percent ISA and potential impacts to water quality in semi-arid environments. Landsat data were used to determine land cover and ultimately percent ISA for the Cache County urban area in northeast Utah, a rural-urban interface community. Water chemistry and discharge data were collected from canals fed by the Logan River during 5 stormwater runoff events and two dry, background events in the summer of 2003. Dissolved heavy metals, nutrients, sediment, oil and grease, fecal coliforms, and field parameters were all measured. Contributing areas to the sampling locations were determined using USGS topography maps, GIS, and consultation with city and county planners. Regressions of mean concentration at each sampling site against ISA revealed positive relationships (p

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Mar 25th, 11:40 AM Mar 25th, 11:45 AM

The Effects of Urbanization on Watershed Functions: The Relationship between Impervious Surface Area and Water Quality in Cache County, Utah

Space Dynamics Laboratory

Impervious surface area (ISA) has emerged in recent years as an important indicator of cumulative water quality impacts to urban watersheds. This study was conducted to test relationships between percent ISA and potential impacts to water quality in semi-arid environments. Landsat data were used to determine land cover and ultimately percent ISA for the Cache County urban area in northeast Utah, a rural-urban interface community. Water chemistry and discharge data were collected from canals fed by the Logan River during 5 stormwater runoff events and two dry, background events in the summer of 2003. Dissolved heavy metals, nutrients, sediment, oil and grease, fecal coliforms, and field parameters were all measured. Contributing areas to the sampling locations were determined using USGS topography maps, GIS, and consultation with city and county planners. Regressions of mean concentration at each sampling site against ISA revealed positive relationships (p

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2004/AllPosters/6