Event Title

What Makes the Great Salt Lake Level go Up and Down?

Presenter Information

David G. Tarboton
Ibrahim N. Mohammed

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-27-2006 10:45 AM

End Date

3-27-2006 11:00 AM

Description

The Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, is the fourth largest, perennial, terminal lake in the world. The Great Salt Lake Level fluctuates due to the balance between inflows and outflows. Inflows are due to streamflow, primarily from the Bear River (54%), Weber River (18%) and Jordan/Provo River (28%) systems. Inflows also include precipitation directly on the lake and groundwater both from the East and West sides. The only outflow is evaporation that is controlled by the climate and area of the lake that changes with level. The GSL reached historic high levels above 1284 m in 1873 and 1986. A historic low at 1278 m occurred in 1963. These fluctuations represent the dynamic interactions between the climate and hydrology of the Great Salt Lake Basin as well as the dynamic interaction between lake volume, area and salinity that impact evaporation from the lake. This paper examines the relationships between Basin climate (precipitation and temperature), Inflows to the lake (primarily streamflow) and outflows (evaporation). Historic streamflow used is from USGS stations, both unimpacted hydroclimatic stations and major inflows to the lake near the downstream end of rivers. Precipitation and temperature inputs are from the University of Washington (1/8) degree gridded meteorological data. We separate lake volume changes into increases in the spring (due to spring runoff) and declines in the fall (due to evaporation). These are then analyzed and related to precipitation, streamflow and climate.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 27th, 10:45 AM Mar 27th, 11:00 AM

What Makes the Great Salt Lake Level go Up and Down?

Eccles Conference Center

The Great Salt Lake (GSL), Utah, is the fourth largest, perennial, terminal lake in the world. The Great Salt Lake Level fluctuates due to the balance between inflows and outflows. Inflows are due to streamflow, primarily from the Bear River (54%), Weber River (18%) and Jordan/Provo River (28%) systems. Inflows also include precipitation directly on the lake and groundwater both from the East and West sides. The only outflow is evaporation that is controlled by the climate and area of the lake that changes with level. The GSL reached historic high levels above 1284 m in 1873 and 1986. A historic low at 1278 m occurred in 1963. These fluctuations represent the dynamic interactions between the climate and hydrology of the Great Salt Lake Basin as well as the dynamic interaction between lake volume, area and salinity that impact evaporation from the lake. This paper examines the relationships between Basin climate (precipitation and temperature), Inflows to the lake (primarily streamflow) and outflows (evaporation). Historic streamflow used is from USGS stations, both unimpacted hydroclimatic stations and major inflows to the lake near the downstream end of rivers. Precipitation and temperature inputs are from the University of Washington (1/8) degree gridded meteorological data. We separate lake volume changes into increases in the spring (due to spring runoff) and declines in the fall (due to evaporation). These are then analyzed and related to precipitation, streamflow and climate.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2006/AllAbstracts/11