Event Title

Investigation of Bathymetry and Bottom Characteristics for the South Part of Great Salt Lake, Utah

Presenter Information

Robert L. Baskin

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-27-2006 9:15 AM

End Date

3-27-2006 9:30 AM

Description

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Division of Wildlife

Resources, collected bathymetric data for the south part of Great Salt Lake during 2002-04 using a high-definition fathometer and real-time differential global positioning system. About 7.6 million depth measurements were collected along more than 930 miles (1,690 kilometers) of survey transects. Sound-velocity profiles were obtained in conjunction with the bathymetric data to provide time-of-travel corrections to the depth calculations. Data were processed with commercial hydrographic software and exported into geographic information system (GIS) software for mapping and calculation of area and volume. A bathymetric survey of the north part of Great Salt Lake is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2006.

Characteristics of the sonar returns from the bathymetric survey allow for interpretation of the physical nature of the lake bottom. Areas of mud, sand, hard surfaces, and rocky or rough bottom surfaces were apparent in the record, although confirmation of the different substrates was available only through visual inspection. Test results of a 1200 kilohertz side-scan sonar survey in an area north of Antelope Island show an abundance of bioherms (stromatolites) on the bottom of the lake, along with ripple marks in adjacent sands.

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Mar 27th, 9:15 AM Mar 27th, 9:30 AM

Investigation of Bathymetry and Bottom Characteristics for the South Part of Great Salt Lake, Utah

Eccles Conference Center

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Division of Wildlife

Resources, collected bathymetric data for the south part of Great Salt Lake during 2002-04 using a high-definition fathometer and real-time differential global positioning system. About 7.6 million depth measurements were collected along more than 930 miles (1,690 kilometers) of survey transects. Sound-velocity profiles were obtained in conjunction with the bathymetric data to provide time-of-travel corrections to the depth calculations. Data were processed with commercial hydrographic software and exported into geographic information system (GIS) software for mapping and calculation of area and volume. A bathymetric survey of the north part of Great Salt Lake is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2006.

Characteristics of the sonar returns from the bathymetric survey allow for interpretation of the physical nature of the lake bottom. Areas of mud, sand, hard surfaces, and rocky or rough bottom surfaces were apparent in the record, although confirmation of the different substrates was available only through visual inspection. Test results of a 1200 kilohertz side-scan sonar survey in an area north of Antelope Island show an abundance of bioherms (stromatolites) on the bottom of the lake, along with ripple marks in adjacent sands.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2006/AllAbstracts/17